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Notice: The Local History & Genealogy Center will be CLOSED on Saturday, August 2, due to the FOWL Book Sale at the Main Library.

Books for Kids (Ages 9-12)

 

Handbook for Dragon Slayers

By Merrie Haskell

 (Juvenile Fiction; ages 8-12 years)

Princess Matilda – Tilda – is the heir to a self-sufficient principality, though recently, things don’t seem to be going well. Because of her twisted and pigeon-toed foot, many believe that Tilda’s family is cursed. Tilda does her best to ignore her people’s negative reactions and carry on with her duties, but what she really wants to do is leave her current situation for a life of copying books, or even writing her own! When her cousin Ivo kidnaps her with the intent of taking over her land, Tilda sees a win-win opportunity: her people can get an intact prince they can love, and she can devote her life to books. Dragons, magic horses, and evil villains are all part of the ensuing adventure.  (Format: Print)

 

 

 

Paper Artist: Creations Kids Can Fold, Tear, Wear, Or Share

By Gail D. Green, Kara L. Laughlin, and Jennifer Phillips

(Juvenile Non-fiction)

Step-by-sep instructions teach readers how to create decorations, presents, keepsakes, and accessories with paper. (Format: Print)

 

 

 

Bluffton: My Summers With Buster

By Matt Phelan

(Juvenile Graphic Novel; ages 9 and up)

Bluffton is the story of Henry, a quiet boy living a quiet life in Muskegon, Michigan in 1908. Quiet, that is, until vaudeville comes to town.  It all starts when Henry watches an elephant unload from a train. Quickly, Henry makes friends with Buster, the youngest member of the famous “Three Keatons.” That’s right; its Buster Keaton (famed star of the silent movie era).  The vaudevillians are summering in Bluffton, a small community on the shores of Muskegon Lake. Henry and Buster play baseball, swim, and laze about.  And of course, Henry wants what Buster has and vice versa. The graphic novel follows through several the summers of the boys’ friendship.  Matt Phelan is genius at crating atmosphere, ambiance, and story via illustration. Much is going on that isn’t overtly discussed, such as Buster’s father and his drinking, and Buster’s mixed feelings about performing. Younger readers may not catch-on to these subtleties, which is not a problem at all. There is enough story here for young and old. (Format: Print)

 

 

  

Primates: the Fearless Science of Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey, and Birute Galdikas

By Jim Ottaviani & Maris Wicks

(Juvenile Graphic Novel; ages 10 years and up)

This book gives a brief glimpse into the interwoven scientific lives of three amazing female primatologists. It shows how they each got started in the field, and how that field never really let them go. These women were forerunners in primatology, a fact the book displays clearly: Illustrations abound of primitive campsites and their rugged conditions, and the text frankly describes how the scientists had to make up methodology on the fly.  In addition, these women were scientists in an age when women were just starting to spread their wings in that arena.  They didn’t just pave the way for primatologists, but also for women in the sciences in general. Talk about awesome role models! (Format: Print)

 

 

  

Hold Fast

By Blue Balliett

(Juvenile Fiction; ages 9-12 years)

When her father disappears on his way home from his job at the Chicago Public Library, Early Pearl and her mom and brother find themselves plunged into a world of danger and despair.  Forced to live in a city shelter after their apartment is broken into and destroyed, Early is determined to find out what happened to her dad AND to find a home for her family.  A satisfying blend of puzzle, poetry, and word play, this is a smart mystery with heart.  Recommended for readers in grades 4 through 6 who like mysteries and realistic fiction. (Formats: Print; Book-on-CD)

  

 

 

Flora & Ulysses: the Illuminated Adventures

By Kate DiCamillo; illus. K.G. Campbell

(Juvenile Fiction; ages 10 and up)

(Winner of the 2014 Newbery Medal.) Holy unanticipated occurrences! It begins, as the best superhero stories do, with a tragic accident that has unexpected consequences. The squirrel never saw the vacuum cleaner coming, but self-described cynic Flora Belle Buckman, who has read every issue of the comic book Terrible Things Can Happen to You!, is the just the right person to step in and save him. What neither can predict is that Ulysses (the squirrel) has been born anew, with powers of strength, flight, and misspelled poetry -- and that Flora will be changed too, as she discovers the possibility of hope and the promise of a capacious heart. A laugh-out-loud story filled with eccentric, endearing characters. (Formats: Print; eBook; Book-on-CD)

 

  

 

Reaching for Sun

By Tracie Vaughn Zimmer

(Juvenile Fiction; ages 8-12 years)

Seventh-grader Josie has cerebral palsy and understands that this will always set her apart from other children.  But that doesn’t dampen her longing for acceptance.  Her grandmother offers unconditional love and so does Josie’s busy mother who isn’t around much.  But finally, Josie finds a friend!  Someone who is like herself – different in his own way.  As the book’s narrator, Josie makes many references to the outdoors, gardening, and growing plants as she draws parallels between her life and nature.  The book is written in free verse poems.  Reluctant readers will be drawn to the sparse text, but older readers will be captivated by the beautiful imagery.  (Format: Print)

 

  

 

Parrots Over Puerto Rico

By Susan L. Roth and Cindy Trumbore

(Juvenile non-fiction; ages 8-12 years)

This is the true story of the parrots that live on Puerto Rico.  Once numbering in the hundreds of thousands, by the 1970’s there were fewer than 25 parrots living on the island.  Not only a chronology of the parrots’ history, this is also the story of conversation efforts to save the magnificent, colorful birds.  The design and illustrations (which are collages) of this book are also excellent.  Interestingly, this book is in a vertical format, meaning you turn the book and lift the pages from bottom to top ( instead of the usual right to left).  This book won the Sibert Medal for most distinguished informational book for children.  (Format: Print)

 

 

   

Strawberry Girl

By Lois Lenski

(Juvenile Fiction; ages 8-12 years)

This is a realistic story about life in the Florida backwoods in the 1940’s when times were changing. Birdie Boyer lives with her family on a small farm where they intend to plant a strawberry crop as their main source of income. But they must battle their uncouth neighbors who let their children and their animals run wild, and don’t put any stock in “book learning.” A regional story, written in dialect, the novel gives a peek at how very different life was in Florida prior to its development. The author also contributed the illustrations, which add depth and detail to the story. Lenski, an Ohio author, received the Newbery medal in 1946 for her distinguished contribution to American literature for children. (Formats: Print; Book-on-CD; e-Book) 

 

 

  

Good Brother, Bad Brother: The Story of Edwin Booth and John Wilkes Booth

By James Cross Giblin

(Juvenile Non-Fiction; ages 10 -14 years)

Edwin Booth and his younger brother John Wilkes Booth were among America’s finest actors; having inherited their father’s commanding stage presence.  The Booth brothers were also very different, with Edwin voting for Abraham Lincoln and John an advocate of the Confederacy.  The author draws on first-hand accounts of family members, friends, and colleagues to create vivid images of Edwin Booth and his brother John Wilkes, best known today as the man who shot Abraham Lincoln.  He traces the events leading up to the assassination and describes the effects of John Wilkes’ infamous deed on Booth, his family, and his country. (Format: Print) 

 

 

 

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